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in 20th-century america, and how people and events have shaped economic decisions that affect our lives. those decisions usually involve tradeoffs. in 1980, congress designated over 100 million acres of alaskan land as national parks and wilderness areas. why did congress make that decision? how much did it cost the nation? in 1867, when the united states purchased the territory of alaska from russia, the acquisition was derided as wasted money. a century later, after two gold rushes, alaska braced for another. the new gold was oil. millions of barrels lay beneath the permafrost. during the 1970s, when the skyrocketing price of foreign oil threatened to devastate the american economy, alaskan oil seemed to promise hope for american energy independence. then along came 1979. revolutionary shock waves spread through islamic nations. iran cut off petroleum exports to the united states. america felt it was held hostage by dependence on foreign oil. as the price of a gallon of gas passed a dollar, congress debated closing off 100 million alaskan acres to mineral exploitation. the bill would
islamic nations. iran cut off petroleum exports to the united states. america felt it was held hostage by dependence on foreign oil. as the price of a gallon of gas passed a dollar, congress debated closing off 100 million alaskan acres to mineral exploitation. the bill would double our national park system. alaska congressman don young was outraged. how selfish and ridiculous can we be when we think we can live within ourselves? we have billions of people in asia alone, south america is suffering from starvation, and we're going to set aside 175 million acres of land for a playground that has all the minerals and oil and resources-- timber and hydropower? that's asinine! other congressmen saw the issue in more personal terms. arizona congressman mo udall. the most important thing to me is that it's there. you get a real lift from getting out of the artificial world and being with nature. not only oil lay beneath the tundra. minerals vital to national defense were being imported from the third world while unknown quantities waited in alaska. the amounts were assumed to be vast. the ala
america's most unequal countries. he was sworn in today with a promise to wage war on poverty. >> he is taking office after a turbulent year in paraguay. last june, it was isolated in the region after the controversial impeachment of a former president. now it is hoped he will be built paraguay's links with neighbors. >> paraguay was not allowed to participate in the last summit in july. it was suspended from the alliance last year when they decided the paraguay senate had undemocratically removed the country's president. now paraguay is said to be readmitted to the group, which includes venezuela, brazil, argentina, and uruguay. like the eu, it is a common market, but in south america, political disputes have often hampered free trade. these days, eu nations export nearly 2/3 of their goods to each other. now brazil, south america's biggest economy, is looking to unilaterally strengthen trade ties with the eu, potentially undermining the partnership. >> time to check in with the markets now. we have been watching the days trading in frankfurt. >> traders and frankfurt have a lot of
against the bank of america earlier in the week for misleading investors about the real risk involved in putting money into mortgage-backed securities. investors lost hundreds of millions of dollars in those investments, but the bank claims it is not responsible for the subsequent property collapse which led to those massive losses. mexico's obesity rate is now higher than in the united states, and it is still on the rise. a united nations report has put mexico's obesity rate at the 32% of adults, making it the fattest country in the western hemisphere. >> diet and particularly the high consumption of sugary soft drinks are getting much of the blame, but the country's sotalol b is fighting back, saying that a lack of exercise and the country's love of fried foods are the real culprits. >> it may seem a little ironic, but members of the sotalol be have even launched a new health awareness campaign. -- members of the soda lobby. >> mexicans consume more soft drinks than anyone else in the world. big demand means good is this for international beverage companies, but the sugary beverages
america's military is ready to take action if the president orders. meanwhile, the syrian government said it would allow u.n. inspectors to access the site of the alleged attack. >> the announcement came as the foreign minister met with the un disarmament chief. the regime said it would allow chemicals inspectors to investigate the suspected gas attack. at the same time, the syrian government warned the u.s. against military intervention, saying it would create a ball of fire that would engulf the region. but washington is not ruling out out. chuckisit to malaysia, hagel says the u.s. is ready for all eventualities. >> the president has asked the defense department to prepare options for all contingencies. we have done that. to again, we are prepared exercise whatever options if he decides to employ one of those options. >> western leaders are increasingly convinced chemical weapons were used in an attack on damascus. a report by doctors without borders says 3600 were admitted to hospital suffering neurotoxic symptoms. of those, 355 have died. the attack has strong condemnation from aroun
checkyearly.com. a public service message from the vision council of america and reading is fundamental. funding for this program is provided by annenberg media. narrator: of all the planets in our solar system, none can support complex life except earth. but the conditions on earth were not always so suitable for life, and scientists are working to reconstruct the history of two essential requirements whmake tlanet hatable. the first is free oxygen in the atmosphere. the other is a moderate and stable climate. paleontologist andy knoll has spent much of his career examining earth's rock record
are off to central america where archaeologists have discovered a 1500-year-old mayan freeze. they excavated the sculpture in the jungles of northern guatemala. >> the well preserved picture. researchers said the findings would provide important clues on the mayan civilization. they say further discoveries are likely. indiana jones would be on his way. all right, you are up to date. we will see you again at the top of the hour. ♪ >> thank you for watching. i am chris moore. thank you for watching. the u.s. is not interested in spying on people. they will now push ahead with special programs. the u.s. and russia are finding ways to progress, despite many disagreements. between theship white house and the kremlin continues to deteriorate over edward snowden. at
sank about one kilometer from sure. >> a report in the "washington post" newspaper says america's nsa intelligence agency has broken privacy laws and overstepped its legal authority thousands of times, citing documents leaked by edward snowden. the paper says most of the infringements involved unauthorized surveillance of americans and foreigners in the united states. >> a controversial french lawyer often nicknamed devils advocate has died at the age of 88. he defended some of the 20th century's most notorious criminals, including a former captain of the nazi secret police and ex-yugoslav leader. well, ecuador has just scrapped a huge conservation plan. it was an ambitious one that had been designed to stop oil drilling in parts of the national park in the amazon rain forest. >> nor's president decided to raise funds for one of the most bio diverse areas in the world. >> however, he says only a tiny fraction of the money trickled in. he has ditched the plan and is opening up the basin to oil drilling instead. >> ecuador's national park is a largely untouched national wonder. the rain
and why it has such profound implications for america's national security. and all of us should be accountable as we move forward, and that can only be accomplished with a vote. i'm confident in the case our government has made without waiting for u.n. inspectors. i'm comfortable going forward without the approval of a united nations security council that so far has been completely paralyzed and unwilling to hold assad accountable. as a consequence many people have advised against taking this decision to congress, and undoubtedly they were impacted by what we saw happen in the united kingdom this week when the parliament of our closest ally failed to pass a esolution with a similar goal, even as the prime minister supported taking action. yet while i believe i have the authority to carry out this military action without specific congressional authorization, i know that the country will be stronger if we take this course and our actions will be even more effective. >> president obama there speaking just a short while ago. let's go now live to washington and our correspondent, max
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)